21

Jul

Expo Skills Print E-mail
Written by Leah, Snowy Student Term 3 2009   

So today my expo team (1B) went on this massive, huge, exhausting walk a whole 4km!!!

It was pretty fun though and we learnt a whole heap about the environment and about things we need to know about camping in the bush and how to look after ourselves.

We were supposed to leave school at around 10 but of course we were late and left at 10.30. The reason for leaving later was because everyone wanted to make sure that we have everything right for our day trip. We all had to pack everything needed for the trip in a day pack that filled to the top, mostly because of our gore-tex clothes that we had to pack even though the weather was lovely and warm.

We had our map, elected out navigator and we were ready to go. Before we started the real walk, we had to go past the birds nest and over the electric fence, don’t worry though, there was a very safe ladder that we walked over and it got us to the other side safely. Then finally, we were off.

The walk was not actually very long but it was interesting seeing the wildlife and making our way through trees and shrubs and actually knowing where we were going thanks to Nick, that amazing navigator. We did have quite a few arguments though just because we were unsure if they were taking us in the right direction but everything seemed to turn out right when we got to the beautiful dirt road that was the Aerodrome Road. From there it was more a matter of following the road until we came to a place to set up our camp and have lunch.

We got to the opening in about 20 minutes and then split up into twos to set up our tents and lunch. My tent was set up the quickest of course. After that and everyone finally had their tent ready to go, we started lunch. Earlier in the morning when we were getting our stuff together we all got to pick out a cup-of-soup mix, mine was chicken noodle. Since the school is all about minimal impact, all we had to do for our cup-of-soup was boil some water in a cooking stove. Thank goodness, because I hate cup-of-soup we also hadwraps which were delicious!

When we were finished with our lunches and full as a goose, we headed home and of course we made sure that we had left nothing at all behind except our footprints. The way home was much quicker because the teachers showed us a much better short cut. We got home and I almost fell asleep because I was so tired.

All in all, the day was really good and we learnt lots about the outdoors. I can tell that it will help us in the future when it comes to our over night expos. So thank you to all the teachers that helped us along today.

That’s all from me, xoxo

Leah, Princes Hill Secondary

 

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School For Student Leadership

School for Student Leadership is a Victorian Department of Education and Training (DET) initiative offering a unique residential education experience for year nine students. The curriculum focuses on personal development and team learning projects sourced from students' home regions. There are three campuses in iconic locations across Victoria. The Alpine School Campus is located at Dinner Plain in the Victorian Alps. Snowy River Campus is near the mouth of the Snowy River at Marlo in east Gippsland. The third site is adjacent to Mount Noorat near Camperdown in Victoria’s Western District, and is called Gnurad-Gundidj. After consultation with the local aboriginal community, this name represents both the indigenous name of the local area and an interpretation of the statement "belonging to this place".
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Our school community acknowledges the Gunaikurnai, Bidawel and Gundijmara people as the traditional custodians of the land upon which our school campuses are built. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their Elders past and present, and especially whose children attend our school.