10

Jun

Caving was Amazing Print E-mail
Today was a miserable day to start off with half of us woken up through the night because of the rain and hail falling on the tin roof. Then core one set off on their 1 hour road trip down to the Buchan caves.

All dressed in our fireman out fits we were as we split into 2 groups. My group went to the dirty muddy cave first which was in the middle of a paddock. We climbed through a hole as big as a basket ball ring and then we ventured on from there.

Once we were in we split into another 2 groups. We walked off climbing through tiny little mouse holes which each had their own special name until we got to a gap between 2 rocks they call “the letter box”. We all successfully made it through that and then we went through another few but I don’t remember what they were called until we were sent through this tiny little gap and we were on “the balcony”. it was about 5-10 meters above the floor of the cave, it was really cool. There were a few tricky spots to get through and then we went up the edge of a wall and it was almost vertical until we came to an end and had to drive back to the main office and had lunch which was chicken snitchzel on bread. Then it was my groups turn to go into the other cave which was more preserved and we weren’t allowed to touch anything because it could wreck them.

Once we had walked out after that we saw 5 little wallabies sitting right in front of us. Then me and dale went for an explore climbing up hills and over rocks. Then it was time to leave and when we were driving home just about everyone on the bus fell asleep. (Except the driver)  It was the best experience here so far!

By Tom

 

 

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School For Student Leadership

School for Student Leadership is a Victorian Department of Education and Training (DET) initiative offering a unique residential education experience for year nine students. The curriculum focuses on personal development and team learning projects sourced from students' home regions. There are three campuses in iconic locations across Victoria. The Alpine School Campus is located at Dinner Plain in the Victorian Alps. Snowy River Campus is near the mouth of the Snowy River at Marlo in east Gippsland. The third site is adjacent to Mount Noorat near Camperdown in Victoria’s Western District, and is called Gnurad-Gundidj. After consultation with the local aboriginal community, this name represents both the indigenous name of the local area and an interpretation of the statement "belonging to this place".
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Our school community acknowledges the Gunaikurnai, Bidawel and Gundijmara people as the traditional custodians of the land upon which our school campuses are built. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their Elders past and present, and especially whose children attend our school.